corenominal

Full stack web developer, interested in all the things, but especially the web, code, design, Linux, OS X, PHP, WordPress, JavaScript & robots.

Tagged: wordpress

State of the Word, 2016 image/svg+xml

The full video and Q&A from 2016’s State of the Word last week in Philadelphia is now online. This year was especially exciting because it wasn’t just a look back at the previous year, but sets out a new direction for where WordPress will be in 2017 and beyond.

It’s a long video, but if you’re at all interested in WordPress, it’s well worth watching. Details about the new release schedule start about 54 minutes in.

About pwgenWEB Password Generator

Back in August, I created pwgenGUI, a little Python front-end to pwgen. Today, I had a day off work, so I created pwgenWEB, a little web front-end to pwgen.

To be honest, there isn’t anything special about this password generator, in fact, I’d probably recommend that you don’t use it. That said, it was fun to build and it has helped me test out a few things, including my newly designed WordPress theme.

For anyone who might be interested, the tool uses a custom WordPress REST API endpoint to call pwgen with the arguments passed via an AJAX call.

I’ve tried to include feature parity with the desktop app, namely:

  • Configurable options, including character length and the inclusion of uppercase, numeric and special characters.
  • Saves settings across sessions, enabling you to use the same password policy (handled by js-cookie).
  • 1-click password generation — generates a password on application start page load.
  • Easily copy passwords to clipboard (handled by clipboard.js).

Anyhow, feel free to use it, or not. Or, if you’re looking for something that’s a little more fun, try something like Passweird.

A Simplified WordPress TinyMCE Editor

Sometimes, you might want to remove a few buttons from the WordPress TinyMCE editor. There could be a whole bunch of reasons for wanting to do this, but I’m not going to get into that just now. Anyhow, it’s good to know that you can make a simplified TinyMCE user interface, if you want/need to.

The following function and call to add_filter() will do just that.

You could use the above in your theme’s functions.php file, or wherever you deem fit, and it should result in an editor that looks similar to the image below (note the number of buttons).

A Simplified WordPress TinyMCE Editor

A simplified WordPress editor.

More information about removing buttons from the WordPress TinyMCE editor can be found here.

Sentence Length Colorization image/svg+xml

Certainly, good writing is more than just varied sentence length, but this is a fantastic visualization that makes an excellent point. It wouldn’t hurt to be able to see this kind of thing in our own writing, in an on-demand fashion while editing.

I really like this idea, it would be great to see something like this as a feature within the WordPress editor.

WordPress Security: This wp-config.php Protects Your Website image/svg+xml

There are many ways to protect your WordPress-based website from getting hacked. The optimization of the wp-config.php can be considered to be an important part of a proper security strategy. Of course, the site won’t turn into the Bank of England, but you’ve made it a little harder for the hackers.

Some good tips for hardening your WordPress installation.

Highlights From the 2016 Annual State Of The Word image/svg+xml

A good break down of Matt Mullenweg’s 10th annual State of the Word address. The most interesting part being:

Mullenweg wrapped up the talk with a discussion of the future. The biggest thing changing will be the release schedule — most notably, there won’t be one. Instead of trying to stay to three releases a year like we have been for the last five years, Mullenweg is going to take the role of production lead and focus on three main areas. Now, instead of pushing a release at a certain time, nothing will be updated until it is the way he wants it.

I like this, it reminds me of Debian’s Release When Ready policy, which always struck me as a logical and sensible approach to releasing stable software. I’m not saying that I have anything against the release early, release often philosophy, but I do think it’s good to mix things up now-and-again.

241: Rapidfire 77 – ShopTalk image/svg+xml

I hate WordPress and every time you talk WordPress. I don’t hate it because of what it is but because of its role and side effects in the web industry. Shouldn’t we as web professionals be the guardians of our industry and try to push to the right direction? And what is the right direction?

I always enjoy listening to Dave and Chris, but I especially enjoyed listening to their conversation about hating on WordPress. Well worth a listen.

Learning WordPress development and how employers should look at candidates image/svg+xml

In this episode, Joe and Brian talk about how they learned WordPress development, how we think employers should look at skill hiring, and resources for learning.

It’s interesting to find out how others learned WordPress and web development. Like Joe and Brian, I have no formal education or training in web development, I trained as an engineer. I started learning web development (~20 years ago) because it piqued my interest and because I have a desire to know how things work. I think that’s probably the key to successful learning, you have to possess a genuine interest in the topic, and if you have that, everything else should follow naturally.

What to Expect in WordPress 4.7 image/svg+xml

A good breakdown of the new features coming in WordPress 4.7. The REST API Content Endpoints are pretty cool, but to be honest, I’m more excited about PDF Thumbnail previews (jk!) Also, the Custom Page Template Functionality is finally going to make an appearance, although after all this time without it, I have to wonder if it’s really needed? Anyhow, 4.7 looks like it’s going to be a good release.