corenominal

Full stack web developer, interested in all the things, but especially the web, code, design, Linux, OS X, PHP, WordPress, JavaScript & robots.

Tagged: web development

It’s a full stack life for me

I was thinking that it might be a good idea to log some of the tasks that I perform during my working day as a full stack web developer. So, I’ve created a new category of posts on my blog and I’ve started to do just that.

Under this category, I’ll be writing about the general tasks that I perform, but I’ll probably not dive into specifics in great detail. If I ever write about something that you’d like more details on, feel free to get in touch.

I’m not hoping to achieve anything by keeping this log, other than to give others an insight into what full stack development is like for me. Maybe it’ll pique someone’s interest, maybe it won’t, either way, it should provide a good historical record that I’ll be able to look back on in years to come.

How You Can Use HTML5 Custom Data Attributes and Why image/svg+xml

In this article, I am going to show you how you can use HTML5 custom data attributes. I’m also going to present you with some use cases that you can find helpful in your work as a developer.

I can’t remember when I started using custom data attributes, it has to be five years ago at least, it’s certainly been long enough to wonder what I ever did without them. Anyhow, if you’ve yet to learn about custom data attributes, this article seems as good as any.

Ouibounce image/svg+xml

A small library enabling you to display a modal before a user leaves your website.

I used this javascript library today for a client. Personally, I don’t like these exit intent scripts, but I can see why others might think they hold some value. It’ll be interesting to track the conversion rates and find out if it actually works. I’m thinking not, in which case it’ll be easy enough to remove.

In AMP we trust image/svg+xml

Jeremy Keith on AMP, concludes with:

Google says it can’t trust our self-hosted AMP pages enough to pre-render them. But they ask for a lot of trust from us. We’re supposed to trust Google to cache and host copies of our pages. We’re supposed to trust Google to provide some mechanism to users to get at the original canonical URL. I’d like to see trust work both ways.

And there lies the rub. My trust levels for Google are very low. I’ve been around long enough to know that hosted Google services/projects come-and-go with little regard to their users. Wave, Jaiku, Buzz, Reader, Knol, the list is quite impressive.

I know AMP is different from the services on the aforementioned list, but the trust damage has already been done. For me, AMP will need to fully establish itself and showcase real benefits, before I trust it enough to invest any development time in it. I’m doubtful that’ll ever happen.

Modern Web Development image/svg+xml

A history lesson of web development that ends with some solid advice:

We all have to make our best guess about what the future will hold. My advice is to focus on what makes you productive today and ignore all the noise and hype about what’s just around the corner. Ignore people like me who are foolish enough to lean precariously over the bleeding edge. Don’t be a fashion-driven-developer. Don’t be a Sneetch! If you’re productive with jQuery, use jQuery! If Google Web Tools is your jam, then jam on! If you want to create a progressive app, then send me a link when you do. If you want your web apps to be completely stateless and rendered server-side, it’s likely you’ll do just fine (just ask Craigslist). Build for today, ignore the hype, and embrace the future when we get there.

4 Key Misconceptions about WordPress Development Debunked image/svg+xml

Powering nearly 27.5 percent of the web, WordPress is one of the most popular Content Management Systems (CMS) available. However, not everyone is familiar with the wide-range of functionality it offers. Worse yet, the internet is crawling with ‘alternative facts’ about its features and development that could stop you in your tracks.

Fortunately, these myths and misconceptions don’t hold water. In reality, WordPress is a great fit for all manner of sites, and developing for the platform is a breeze.

A good effort at debunking some common misconceptions about WordPress.