corenominal

Full stack web developer, interested in all the things, but especially the web, code, design, Linux, OS X, PHP, WordPress, JavaScript & robots.

Tagged: news

Growing Ubuntu for Cloud and IoT, rather than Phone and convergence image/svg+xml

I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Wow! This is a huge announcement from Mark Shuttleworth. Personally, I think it’s the right decision and his reasoning is sound, I’m just a little surprised that it took him this long to come to his senses. I hope all my friends and acquaintances at Canonical come out of this OK.

Anyhow, with all reasoning and difficult decision making aside, Ubuntu with GNOME as its default desktop should be totally awesome, I can’t wait.

Highlights From the 2016 Annual State Of The Word image/svg+xml

A good break down of Matt Mullenweg’s 10th annual State of the Word address. The most interesting part being:

Mullenweg wrapped up the talk with a discussion of the future. The biggest thing changing will be the release schedule — most notably, there won’t be one. Instead of trying to stay to three releases a year like we have been for the last five years, Mullenweg is going to take the role of production lead and focus on three main areas. Now, instead of pushing a release at a certain time, nothing will be updated until it is the way he wants it.

I like this, it reminds me of Debian’s Release When Ready policy, which always struck me as a logical and sensible approach to releasing stable software. I’m not saying that I have anything against the release early, release often philosophy, but I do think it’s good to mix things up now-and-again.

There’s now an official HTTP status code for legal takedowns: 451 image/svg+xml

HTTP status codes are a core part of helping your browser understand what to do with a page. You’re probably familiar with 404 — page not found — but there are a plethora of others, like 302, which help tell your browser a page has moved.

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has finally created a standard for when a page has been taken down due to legal reasons. The new status code, 451, indicates that a host has received a legal demand to deny access to a resource.

I’m not sure what I think about this. It makes me feel a little sad, but at the same time, I can see why it is needed.