corenominal

Full stack web developer, interested in all the things, but especially the web, code, design, Linux, OS X, PHP, WordPress, JavaScript & robots.

Tagged: fonts

Free Fonts With Personality image/svg+xml

Typography can make all the difference. However, if your project has to get along on a very limited budget and you need to rely on free fonts, good ones are never easy to find. Luckily, we stumbled across some real gems lately. The following fonts can be downloaded for free and are bound to give your project — both private and/or commercial — a classy finishing touch.

A good collection of free fonts. Butler is particularly nice.

Designers’ favorite typefaces image/svg+xml

Nothing stirs up a more impassioned debate with designers than asking them to choose their favorite typeface. So this week, we forced a handful of creatives in the InVision community to make that tough decision.

And no lorem ipsum here! They’ve written their favorite word — which, for many, is a breakfast food — using their chosen typeface.

I love these typeface lists, but they make me feel a little guilty for not using a more adventurous font on this site :/

Transport New, Typeface image/svg+xml

Transport New is a redrawing of the typeface designed for British road signs. In addition to the familiar Heavy and Medium weights, the K-Type family includes the previously unreleased Light weight originally planned for back-lit signage but never actually applied.

Not to be confused with New Transport, this is a very similar font, but at just £12 for the entire family (as opposed to £1000 for New Transport), an awful lot cheaper. I’ll be purchasing this one.

New Transport, Typeface image/svg+xml

New Transport is a digital adaption of Transport lettering originally designed by Jock Kinneir & Margaret Calvert in the 1960s; specifically for use on the United Kingdom’s new motorways (followed by the all-purpose roads). With minor modifications, it is still in use today.

I love this typeface and think it is quintessentially English. The only problem is, it’s not cheap, the family of 12 fonts will set you back a cool £1000. Blimey.

P.S. In case you are not aware, this is the same font as used by GOV.UK, the UK Government website.

Canva’s Ultimate Guide to Font Pairing image/svg+xml

Whether you know it or not, different font combinations create different styles for your designs. There’s a science to applying a heading, subheading and body copy to suit the type of content you’re producing and the message or tone of your brand.

To give you a leg up, we’ve put together 30 unique font pairings (with tips and additional techniques) to help you determine what font pairing best suits the design or content you’re creating.

A nice guide to font pairing with some stylish examples.