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Tagged: bash

The 6 Biggest Ubuntu News Stories of 2016 image/svg+xml

6. Bash on Ubuntu on Windows 10
It happened. Hell froze over and Microsoft wrapped its chilly arms around a cynical Linux community uncertain as to its motives. Is it a gesture of love (like they say) or the cynical embrace of a company trying to regain lost relevance?

That’s for you to decide. But one piece of the ‘Microsoft Loves Linux’ puzzle that slotted in to place this year was the arrival of the Windows Subsystem for Linux in the Windows 10 Anniversary Update (no, really. It happened).

Is it a little bit sad for Ubuntu that one of its biggest stories of 2016 was its involvement in the Window Subsystem for Linux? Don’t get me wrong, I think it was a nifty thing to happen, but I’m not sure how Ubuntu/Linux benefits? It certainly doesn’t appear to help fix Ubuntu’s bug #1.

Microsoft has a majority market share in the new desktop PC marketplace. This is a bug which Ubuntu and other projects are meant to fix. As the philosophy of the Ubuntu Project states, “Our work is driven by a belief that software should be free and accessible to all.”

Anyhow, it’ll be interesting to see if anything happens with this in 2017.

Bash in Windows 10, it’s weird

Bash in Windows 10

Bash shell in Windows 10.

Last weekend, I finally pulled my finger out and got around to installing the Windows 10 Anniversary update on my dual boot X220. The installation was painless and I didn’t experience any horror stories, thankfully.

After the update was installed, the very first thing I did was to enable the new Windows Subsystem for Linux feature.

Now, I’ve read an awful lot about Bash on Windows, but reading about it and actually trying it are two totally different experiences. Using Bash in Windows just feels weird. Good, but weird. It almost feels like I’ve been transported into some sort of twisted parallel universe where I’m using something that simply shouldn’t exist. Not that I’m complaining, I think it’s marvellous, and weird.

Anyhow, putting the weirdness aside, for someone like me who turns to Bash for all manner of tasks, this elevates Windows into the league of “proper” Operating Systems, along with Linux and OS X.

Kudos to Microsoft and Canonical.

5 Simple Steps To Enable Bash on Windows 10 image/svg+xml

Windows 10 Anniversary Update is here, and it’s rolling out now.

Among the new features it brings is Bash for Windows — an Ubuntu-based tool lets you run familiar Linux apps on Windows natively.

I was pretty excited when I first heard about this and I’m itching to give it a try, but I’ve read some horror stories today about users who have had their disk partitions removed after installing the update.

Currently, I’m thinking that I’ll wait a while before performing the update — I very rarely boot into Windows, so it’ll be no great hardship to wait until things have settled down.

Vote For A New Bash Logo image/svg+xml

For many years, my bash page (tiswww.case.edu/~chet/bash/bashtop.html) has sported a bash logo that someone whose name I have lost donated long ago.

I received a very generous offer to create a new logo and donate it for the project’s use. The benefactor is Justin Dorfman, and he has been very patient to wait for me to select from among a number of good alternatives (part of what made it so tough).

We have narrowed the field to three proposed designs, and it is time for the bash community to decide on the winner.

I like number 2!