corenominal

Full stack web developer, interested in all the things, but especially the web, code, design, Linux, OS X, PHP, WordPress, JavaScript & robots.

Tagged: advice

45 Github Issues Dos and Don’ts image/svg+xml

Some great tips on how to behave on GitHub. I particularly like the “Being a Decent Human Being” tips, including:

Do be charitable with your interpretation of others’ words. For example, reasonable interpretations of “What do you not understand?” include a condescending insult or hurried clarification attempt. But the most charitable interpretation is that it is an open ended invitation to be a data point used to improve the documentation. With global diversity of personalities and cultures participating in open source and the low emotional density of written text, always default to the most charitable interpretation of others’ words.

A practical security guide for web developers image/svg+xml

Security issues happen for two reasons –

  1. Developers who have just started and cannot really tell a difference between using MD5 or bcrypt.
  2. Developers who know stuff but forget/ignore them.

Our detailed explanations should help the first type while we hope our checklist helps the second one create more secure systems. This is by no means a comprehensive guide, it just covers stuff based on the most common issues we have discovered in the past.

I can’t think that I’ve ever seen a really exhaustive web development security checklist, so this looks promising. Still in development, but definitely worth keeping an eye on, or contributing to.

Git Cheat Sheet image/svg+xml

Even with a GUI application at hand there are times when you resort to the command line. We admit we can’t memorize all important Git commands – that’s why we created a nice cheat sheet for Git that we would like to share with you.
On the front you can find all important commands. On the back you can find our Version Control Best Practices that help you get the most out of version control with Git.

I’ve only ever used Git on the command line and I still forget some commands. Anyhow, this is a nice looking cheat sheet and I’ll probably print a copy for my office pin-board.

10 tips for new GitHub projects image/svg+xml

GitHub has become a fairly central part of many open source projects. Although many people focus on the code-hosting aspect of GitHub, the platform also includes comprehensive features for issue management, code review, and integration with many other tools and platforms.

For new open source projects, however, getting started and ensuring that GitHub repos are in tip-top shape and ready to attract new developers can be a little overwhelming. To smooth this transition, here are 10 tips for rocking your octo-project and getting your new project off to a great start.

A good introduction to GitHub by Jono Bacon. I’ve been using GitHub for a while, but still found it to be an interesting read — I wasn’t aware of the CONTRIBUTING.md features. Hmm, I should probably take some time to better explore the services I use.

Stop Feeling Dumb About Pairing Fonts image/svg+xml

You know you need to pick typefaces that will work well together, but it seems like there’s a lot more to it than meets the eye, and you don’t have a year to get up to speed on the ins and outs of typography.

Relax! You don’t need to know all the rules. A few simple guidelines and basic type knowledge will have you making great type choices in no time.

If I can get away with it, I tend to opt for a single font family in my designs. I’m not sure if that’s because I’m terrible at pairing fonts, or because I’m indecisive, or because I just prefer the simplicity/minimalism of a single font. Anyhow, this is a nice guide to font pairing.