corenominal

Full stack web developer, interested in all the things, but especially the web, code, design, Linux, OS X, PHP, WordPress, JavaScript & robots.

Debugging Tips and Tricks image/svg+xml

Writing code is only one small piece of being a developer. In order to be efficient and capable at our jobs, we must also excel at debugging. When I dedicate some time to learning new debugging skills, I often find I can move much quicker, and add more value to the teams I work on. I have a few tips and tricks I rely on pretty heavily and found that I give the same advice again and again during workshops, so here’s a compilation of some of them, as well as some from the community.

Lots of useful debugging advice, well worth a read.

Lighthouse image/svg+xml

Lighthouse is an open-source, automated tool for improving the quality of web pages. You can run it against any page on the web. It has audits for performance, accessibility, progressive web apps, and more.

A nifty tool that provides some helpful hints for improving site performance. I like that it doesn’t just tell you what you’re doing wrong, but shows lots of green ticks for the stuff you’re doing right.

Colormind image/svg+xml

Colormind is a color scheme generator that uses deep learning. It can learn color styles from photographs, movies, and popular art.

A nifty colour scheme generator. It has a nice colour lock feature, which enables easy generation of complementary and intermediate values.

What’s Next for Ubuntu Desktop? Mark Shuttleworth Shares His Plans image/svg+xml

We’re helping the Ubuntu GNOME team, not creating something different or competitive with that effort. While I am passionate about the design ideas in Unity, and hope GNOME may be more open to them now, I think we should respect the GNOME design leadership by delivering GNOME the way GNOME wants it delivered.

Mark is saying all the right things and it’s good to read that he’s respectful of the GNOME team. I’m hoping the Ubuntu devs and release team are listening and taking notes.

The web looks like shit image/svg+xml

Auto-play videos lurking in unopened tabs. Pop-ups that won’t go away. Photos that won’t load. Text that’s invaded by ads. It’s hard to complain about the internet without feeling like a mom struggling to post on Facebook, but going online has started to feel like an assault on the senses.

A sad, but accurate commentary on today’s web.

Making GNOME Shell Feel Like Unity image/svg+xml

I like the way the Ubuntu Unity desktop works. However, a while ago I switched over to Gnome Shell to see what it was like, and it seemed good so I stuck around. But I’ve added a few extensions to it so it feels a bit more like the parts of the Unity experience that I liked. In light of the news from Canonical that they’ll be shipping the Gnome desktop in the next LTS in 2018, and in light of much hand-wringing from people who like Unity as much as I do about how they don’t want to lose the desktop they prefer, I thought I’d write down what I did, so others can try it too.

I’m hoping that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS ships with a stock GNOME Shell experience, but this post has some good tips for Unity lovers.